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Message - Re: minimalism

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Posted by  Paul Malo on September 19, 2002 at 11:23:01:

In Reply to:  Re: minimalism posted by Clarie Lia on September 19, 2002 at 10:53:46:

"Elegance" is sometimes defined as "economy of means."

Not all Japanese art has been minimalist--temples (other than Shinto) tend to be exessively elaborate, by minimalist standards. But minimalism has been a major trend in Japanese culture, from which we have much to learn.

I don't see Mies as being so different from Japanese minimalism, although obviously his European culture reflected Western classicism more than the Japanese tradition. The intent, however, I think, was the same.

I'm not sure about the "emptiness" notion, although I recognize this as related to concepts of meditation. I don't find minimalist Japanese architecture "empty," but to the contrary very rich because it is critically decisive about every minute detail. I certainly don't fine Meis "empty" of meaning but, on the contrary, very eloquent (like Ando).

 
 
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