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Message - Re: Lost New York City - a call to action

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Posted by  Randall on April 05, 2003 at 20:50:02:

In Reply to:  Re: Lost New York City - a call to action posted by Gary R on March 05, 2003 at 09:43:16:

Excellent idea about having people take digital photos like that,as far as books, there are a few I know of such as "New York then and now" "Chicago then and now" etc

The problem with assembling all the photos you mention is they take up a LOT of disk space as you know, I have enough of a pile of megs in my own directory just with the small topic on one city. I think such a project would be out of the league of all private persons who pay for web space since the cost to store so much would be prohibitive.
That leaves a non profit group, a for profit business or someone who owns their own server and can devote the resources.

As we all know the web is dynamic, a for profit business can be here today gone tomorrow if the thing doesn't pay the bills, banner ads and popups are hated and just don't bring in the
revenue.
Most non profits barely scrape by, that really would leave only one viable entity in the group standing: a museum or library, now I am speaking specifically of the Library of Congress as a possible repository.

I know there is the problem of the bureaucracy, form letter esponses and runaround trying to get hold of someone there in charge who could look at such an idea, but think of the possibility there because they DO have the resources.

A look at their web site will show they have tens of thousands of historic photos, film strips, sound files and documents, all indexed and searchable.
In the "American Memory" section there's some 29,000 photos from one photographer's collection alone up there!

Per this category

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/gschtml/gotthome.html

It says:

"The Gottscho-Schleisner Collection is comprised of over 29,000 images primarily of architectural subjects, including interiors and exteriors of homes, stores, offices, factories, historic buildings, and other structures. Subjects are concentrated chiefly in the northeastern United States, especially the New York City area, and Florida. Included are the homes of notable Americans, such as Raymond Loewy, and of several U.S. presidents, as well as color images of the 1939-40 New York World's Fair. Many of the photographs were commissioned by architects, designers, owners and architectural publications, and document important achievements in American 20th-century architecture and interior design."

The "greatbuildings" site is a good resource but as I remember if I have the site right it's pretty commercialized/cluttered with ads and you get "donate now" pages when clicking on photo links if I remember right, real annoying!

Another problem is how to reach the multitudes nation-wide who potentially would or could take digital photos?

I like the idea very much, so if folks are serious let's butt heads a bit on this and see what we can scare up.


 
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