How to put TEXT (embosed) and GRAPHICS on a wall?

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How to put TEXT (embosed) and GRAPHICS on a wall?

Postby gary.s » Sun Jul 04, 2004 11:20 pm

Hi,

Need some help on putting text on a wall, like those that are attatched in buildings? Another thing is, I have this flat panel TV which I hung in the living room, how do I paste an image onto it so it'll look like the TV's ON.

thanks,
GaryS>
gary.s
 
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Postby David Owen » Thu Jul 08, 2004 4:47 pm

Need some help on putting text on a wall, like those that are attatched in buildings?


The DesignWorkshop Object Library includes 3D lettering in a simple, san serif font. The library is called <a href="http://support.artifice.com/user_guide/accessories/3d_libs/lettering-solid-sans_serif.html">Lettering-Solid-Sans Serif</a>.

These letter objects were originally text in <a href="http://www.EngSW.com/">PowerCADD</a>, converted to polylines, exported in PICT or DXF format, then imported into <a href="http://www.artifice.com/dw.html">DesignWorkshop</a> and extruded. Of course, PowerCADD's probably not the only program that can convert text to polylines. And as long as you can save the polylines in a format DW can import (DXF seems the most likely candidate), you should be able to create 3D objects in nearly any font, using the same process.

If you would like a more detailed explanation, please contact <a href="mailto:support@artifice.com">Artifice Support</a>.

Another thing is, I have this flat panel TV which I hung in the living room, how do I paste an image onto it so it'll look like the TV's ON.


A Full-Face Texture would be great for that. Unlike Tiled Textures (eg, Brick-Red-New), for which a PICT image repeats many times across the face of an object, with a Full-Face Texture the PICT image is stretched to fit the object face.

The fast, easy way to make up to three of your own Full-Face textures takes advantage of some materials already included with DesignWorkshop's standard material set. In the <b>Textures</b> folder in your DesignWorkshop program folder there are three PICT files named:

<b>Picture_1</b>
<b>Picture_2</b>
<b>Picture_3</b>

These are fairly generic photos that you can replace with your custom image(s).

Just rename your PICT image with one of these file names (eg, Picture_1), and remove the existing PICT file in the <b>Textures</b> folder, replacing it with yours.

Then, in DesignWorkshop assign the corresponding material (eg, Picture_1) to the "screen" object for your TV. When you view your model in Lights & Textures, your image will be stretched across the face of the screen object.

You can also add more of your own Full-Face Texture definitions to the DW Material Prefs file, manually. It's similar to the process for <a href="http://www.designcommunity.com/forum/8517.html">making your own Tiled Texture</a>, but a bit simpler, since you needn't worry about making the image tile seamlessly.

A basic overview of material types is included in the comments section at the top of a <a href="http://www.artifice.com/tech/material_prefs.html"> standard DW Material Prefs file</a>. More <a href="http://www.artifice.com/support/user_guide/documents/tips/material_types.html">detailed information about material types</a> is included in the <a href="http://www.artifice.com/support/user_guide/">DW User Guide</a>.
David Owen
 
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Joined: Wed Apr 14, 2004 1:34 pm
Location: Eugene, Oregon


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