Photorealistic Rendering and RAM

Discuss 3D CAD and architectural software, and architectural rendering and design media-related topics. Moderated by the Artifice Customer Support Team.

Photorealistic Rendering and RAM

Postby bluedogsb » Wed Mar 04, 2009 9:48 pm

I'm not sure if this is in the right forum, but I'm running a 2.2 GHz processor with 2 gigs of ram. It works for small renders, but nothing impressive. I am pretty sure another 2 gigs of ram (4 gb total) would benefit me, but the question is will I be killing processor? I know I need something way more powerful overall, but for now...

What systems do you guys run for extreme rendering.
bluedogsb
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2009 8:57 pm

Postby Ankit3d » Fri Mar 06, 2009 1:07 pm

Which software do you use?
Ankit3d
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Apr 14, 2007 1:53 pm

Postby bluedogsb » Fri Mar 06, 2009 3:47 pm

I am running SUPodium. I was using IDX Renditioner and that worked fine, but only for small renderings. I use SUPodium with Google SketchUp. I also use TurboCAD 3D, but do my renderings through SketchUp and SUPodium. I am supposed to receive my new RAM today so I'm up to 4 gigs, but haven't attempted any new renderings just yet.

Are there better rendering programs out there that perform better?(SUPodium is pretty sweet) I know of Revvit, and some others, but they most are not for apple computers. And I would rather have fully integrated software and not have to use 3 programs to get a successful rendering.
bluedogsb
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2009 8:57 pm

Postby Ankit3d » Sat Mar 07, 2009 1:03 am

Increasing RAM will definitely increase your rendering speed. But if you want to get maximum benefit from your computer than use 64 bit Windows. A 32 bit windows doesn't allow more than 1.5 GB ram to a single program, so remaining RAM will go waste and not be used by your program.

Cheers.

www.vrayexpert.com
Ankit3d
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Apr 14, 2007 1:53 pm

Postby bluedogsb » Mon Mar 09, 2009 4:31 pm

Thanks for the tip on the 64 bit vs 32 bit processor. Didn't think of that.
bluedogsb
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2009 8:57 pm

Actually

Postby ArchvizStudio » Fri Apr 03, 2009 1:21 pm

bluedogsb, RAM doesn't kill the CPU. You can have as much RAM as your OS permits.

If your rendering software crashes when rendering, or if you experience memory loads close to 80% of RAM on the rendering software alone, then you need more. If none of these things happen, you're alright with what you have.

Ankit3d wrote:A 32 bit windows doesn't allow more than 1.5 GB ram to a single program, so remaining RAM will go waste and not be used by your program.
www.vrayexpert.com


Actually, a 32 bit system is able to address as much as 3,5 GB of RAM (video card memory included) to any 32 bit application.

So, if you have 3 GB of RAM and a 512 MB video card, you're OK. Anything more than that will be unused on a 32 bit OS, and you'll need a 64 bit os.
ArchvizStudio
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Apr 03, 2009 10:39 am
Location: Romania

RAM & CPUs

Postby archiform3d » Fri May 22, 2009 11:42 am

I am on an eight core MacPro at 3 GHZ and with 16 GB of RAM. I run Cinema4D in 64 bit and a ton of other software on it.

I like Mac OSX for this kind of work although more options on available 3D software would be nice... But I still love C4D regardless, which runs perfectly on it.
archiform3d
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat Oct 15, 2005 6:06 pm
Location: USA & Australia

Postby Guest » Sun Jan 30, 2011 9:03 am

I've written an article on this exact topic
Guest
 


Return to Architectural 3D CAD Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests

User Control Panel

Login

Who is online

In this forum zone there are 4 users online :: 0 registered, 0 hidden and 4 guests (based on users active over the past 5 minutes)
Most users ever online was 508 on Thu Jun 25, 2009 11:21 am

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests
DesignCommunity   ·   ArchitectureWeek   ·   Great Buildings   ·   Archiplanet   ·   Books   ·   Blogs   ·   Search
Special thanks to our sustaining subscribers Building Design UK, Building Design News UK, and Building Design Tenders UK.