610m - Hyperboloid Tower in Guangzhou

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610m - Hyperboloid Tower in Guangzhou

Postby LeeHwong » Wed Sep 06, 2006 4:46 am

New 610m-Tower by ARUP in Guangzhou
will be a Hyperboloid structure :!:

The Guangzhou TV and Sightseeing Tower is designed by Mark Hemel and Barbara Kuit of the dutch practise; Information Based Architecture with Arup as the engineers.

Spatially the tower reads like a series of mini-buildings hung within the super-structure, with ‘mega spaces’ in between.

The form, volume and structure are generated by two ellipses, one at foundation level and the other at an imaginary horizontal plane just above 450 metres. The tightening caused by the rotation between the two ellipses forms the characterizing ‘waist-line ’of the tower, and a densification of material. This means that the lattice structure, which at the bottom of the tower is porous and spacious, becomes denser at waist level. The waist itself is tightened, like a twisted rope; Further up the tower the lattice opens again, accentuated here by the tapering of the structural column-tubes.

The design emphasizes the outdoor and physical experience for the visitor. The waist of the tower contains a 180m long open-air skywalk where visitors can physically climb the tower and experience the tower’s structure and narrow waist-line from close by. There are outdoor gardens set within the structure, and at the top at +450m, a large open-air observation landscape opens up magnificent views over the city.

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The interior of the tower will be subdivided into programmatic zones with various functions including: TV and radio transmission facilities, observatory decks, revolving restaurants, computer gaming, restaurants, exhibition spaces, conference rooms, shops and 4D cinemas.

A deck at the base of the tower hides the giant building’s functional workings. All infrastructural connections – metro and bus stations, and a pedestrian link to the northern embankment of the river – are met underground. This level supports other facilities as well, including a museum, a food court, extensive commercial space, a 600-vehicle parking area for cars and tourist coaches. The entrance operates on two levels, one a continuation of the landscape above ground, the other connected to the mass-transit and underground-parking facilities. Slow-speed panoramic and enclosed high-speed double-decker lifts serve both entrance levels.

The intermediate zone, from +80m up to +170m, consist of facilities like a 4D cinema, a play-hall area, restaurants, coffee shops and outdoor gardens with teahouses. An open-air staircase, the Skywalk, starts at the height of +170 metres and spirals almost 200 metres higher, all the way through the waist.

The top zone of the building begins above the stairway, housing various technical functions as well as a two-storey rotating restaurant, a damper and the upper observation levels. From the upper observation levels it is possible to ascend even higher, via a further set of the stairs, to a terraced observation square rising above the tower’s top ring, high above the booming city of Guangzhou.

Mark Hemel; ’ We wanted to offer the city, something simple but complex, a new form that would be in tune with the contemporary times and that would challenge the current building technologies. Where most historical skyscrapers were bearing male characteristics; being angular, simplistic, heavy and based on repetition, we defined our tower to have the identity of a female; smooth, curved, slender, gracious and incorporating an extreme diversity of spaces and floor-plan sizes.’

Since the groundbreaking ceremony in November 2005 the foundation (24 x 4m diameter piles) has been completed, and the steel stucture is being assembled. The tower is due to be completed at the end of 2009, in order to be fully operational for the 2010 Asian Games.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guangzhou_ ... eing_Tower
Last edited by LeeHwong on Sun May 20, 2007 2:24 am, edited 21 times in total.
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Postby Architorture » Wed Sep 06, 2006 7:42 am

seems like a very strange realestate strategy there with the very small floors in the middle and the biggest at the top and bottom...
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Postby Tomekk » Wed Sep 06, 2006 8:30 am

I'd say that the value per square meter would be respectively much higher in the middle part of the building and someone might prefere to have a quarter of a floor to themselves, with a beautiful view....

And the project itself looks really interesting; will probably become a famous landmark.
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maybe hyperboloid

Postby rustream » Wed Sep 06, 2006 10:12 am

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Postby Architorture » Wed Sep 06, 2006 12:09 pm

Tomekk wrote:I'd say that the value per square meter would be respectively much higher in the middle part of the building and someone might prefere to have a quarter of a floor to themselves, with a beautiful view....

And the project itself looks really interesting; will probably become a famous landmark.


part of the reason smaller floorplates at the top of the building still demand higher rates is b/c they are in fact at the top.... i don't see how a small floorplate in the middle can do the same... or how you will find a client to fill the top floor which is essentially the largest floor plate...

of course this assuming this is an office tower...of course even if it were residential at the top having the largest floor plate there still doesn't make sense... or maybe it will be office bottom, res middle, office top?
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Postby Tomekk » Wed Sep 06, 2006 12:48 pm

as the PDF explains there wont be any 'proper' stuff there, just some gardens over smaller buildings
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It is Shukhov's Tower

Postby Guest » Wed Sep 06, 2006 1:11 pm

Towers of such design were built by
Vladimir Shukhov 100 years ago :!:
Image
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Tower in Guangzhou is very similar to Shuttleworth's Tower

Postby LeeHwong » Thu Sep 07, 2006 5:24 am

The design of new Tower in Guangzhou is very similar
to project "The Vortex" by Ken Shuttleworth:

Image
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Guangzhou TV & Sightseeing Tower

Postby Guest » Fri Feb 23, 2007 2:29 am

Guangzhou TV & Sightseeing Tower
http://www.iba-bv.com/
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The Competition -
The international competition was held in 2004 for the design of the tower, a 17.9ha park at its base and the master-plan for the surrounding 56.6ha which includes an elevated Plaza, pagoda-park, retail facilities, offices, television centre and hotel. In the competition for the Guangzhou TV & Sightseeing Tower we cooperated with Arup, initially their Amsterdam office, then later their offices in London, Hong Kong and Shenzhen. Most of the other offices participating in the competition were large commercial practices with lots of high-rise experience - Cannon Design, KPF, Richard Rogers and Coop Himmelb(l)au, among others.

While working on the competition, we wanted to offer the city, something simple but complex, a new form that would be in tune with the contemporary times and that would challenge the current building technologies. Where most historical skyscrapers were bearing male characteristics; being angular, simplistic, heavy and based on repetition, we defined our tower to have the identity of a female; smooth, curved, slender, gracious and incorporating diversity of spaces and floor-plan sizes, in short a sexy tower. The tower would be simple and complex at the same time, and would attempt to form a new and exciting coherence between structure and architectural effects.

Guangzhou TV & Sightseeing Tower
first place in invited international competition
Start 2004 - complete end 2009

Construction cost:
1,2 billion RMB Yuan (Euro 135 million)
Area Tower: 100.000 sqm
Area landscape: 17.4 hectares
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Evolutionary Architecture -
In the Guangzhou TV & Sightseeing Tower project we have attempted to shift emphasis from the conceptual to the material, towards tangible effects and spatial values. We aim to emphasise the experience, to use 'concept' as a tool for generating variation, difference and a range of spatial and material values instead of as an end in itself. We describe our methodology as evolutionary, in that we envisage many variations. Instead of serving specific requirements, our project attempts to generate ranges of qualities, in which particular qualities will be embedded more or less automatically within a whole matrix. Similar to a biological system's strategy for producing a spectrum of offspring instead of focusing all hope and energy on the production of a single specific, type we produce a range of possibilities, some of which will prove to be redund ant, others which we hope will have the strength to survive.

This approach has applied, for instance, to the production of floor-plate sizes and orientations. Each floor is different - in size, intimacy, exposure - and is designed to respond to a specific set of potential users and events. Similarly, the density of the structure, which forms the outer surface, varies over the elevation of the tower. Both floor-plate size and structural density are controlled by the two ellipses governing the structure's design, and together they generate a range of conditions. The more open structure at the top generates a transparent condition that attracts programmatic activities like observation, while the denser areas in the waist of the building provide a more intimate experience.
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The thinnest waist -
Over the design period of the last two years several issues have been investigated. One of the main issues the client wanted to achieve was to develop the tightest waist that was ultimately possible. Budget was of course one important factor in that. For every meter reduction of the waist the cost, was calculated, would rise exponentially, because more steel would be necessary to stiffen this relatively weak part of the tower. Another important factor was the required size of the core which was needed to fit all the required lifts, shafts and emergency staircases. The core had still to be able to be inserted into the tightest area of the waist. The size and shape of the core went over the design-period through a whole evolution: A circular core was optimized to an oval in order to fit it within the tightest waist possible. The waist consisted of a band between +270m and +300m, measuring 20.65 x 27.5m from center column to center column. Which means that taking into account a structural zone of about 3.5m; that there was only about 15.6m space across for the core to fit into, excluding tolerances required for movement of the tower.
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rings,columns & diagonals -
The ring distances are laid out in a gradient that is denser toward the middle of the tower in order to produce a more intimate and closed space within the structure, while at the same time putting steel where it is most efficient.

Columns rings and diagonals form together a web that varies over the section of the tower. The columns are all perfectly straight although the lean over to one direction, giving the tower a dynamic twist. They taper from bottom to top, so to further amplify the perspective view up along the tower. The diagonals are more or less everywhere the same at 800mm. they consist of straight tubes that run between columns fixing the web of nodes into a stiff web. The rings are placed on the inside and their diameter is fixed at 800mm, they are truly round, following the curvature of the faЌade that runs along the inside.

At the bottom of the tower the columns are 2m in diameter, constructed of 50mm thick plated steel that is bend fully round in 3.7m wide bands that are welded together. At the top of the tower the column diameter is reduced to 1100mm with a plate thickness of 30mm. Where the columns where initially thought off as telescopically stepping in small steps of about 20mm, they are finally designed to truly taper, giving a amazingly perspective effect.

Structural description -
The build ability of the nodes was an important challenge while designing the 610meter tall Guangzhou TV and Sightseeing tower. Although none of the 1100 steel nodes are identical, still we succeeded in creating one single type of node.

The structure consist of a open lattice-structure that is twisted over it's axis, therefore creating a tightening waist halfway up the building. This twist has created a slender grace-full profile. The design of the lattice-grid is not only a structural one but is also driven by esthetic and architectural and environmental considerations.

The rings are placed on the far inside of the columns so that they spatially miss each other and are connected off-center. This will make that the inside view is dominated by the rings, while the view from the outside is dominated by the sloping columns. All rings are placed under an angle of 15 degrees, so that both an opening is created for the entrance at the base of the tower, as well as that a sloping deck is created at the top of the building, offering magnificent views over the city.

Site-progress -
Since the winning of the scheme, wind tunnel tests, fire- and load tests have been completed. And since the groundbreaking ceremony in November 2005 the foundation and piling, (24 x 4m diameter piles) have been constructed. The first bits of steel-structure have been assembled above ground.

While building, the contractor initially can work with 5 cranes. But from the waist onwards at about +300m the two cranes positioned within the lattice-structure are taken down, and one will continue with three cranes till the structure and core are completed. The antenna extends another 150 meter. The antenna will be prefabricated in parts that will be lifted to the platform and there put together, and telescopically pushed out starting with the top-end, till the antenna has been completed.

The tower is due to be completed at the end of 2009, in order to be fully operational for the 2010 Asian Games.

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Postby solidred » Fri Feb 23, 2007 9:26 am

Darn! Yet another one of my old pals getting ahead of me... I tell you one thing though: my hyperboloid theories are more interesting than his :wink:
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Postby Guest » Fri Feb 23, 2007 2:02 pm

What is interesting in your hyperboloid theories :?:
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Postby solidred » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:51 pm

Take a possible hyperbolic paraboloid-surfaced skewed cuboid (!)

I mean, that's it. Cool or what? :wink:

Seriously, though, one of these has simple, straight vector-defined bounding conditions. But on the surface itself, a curvilinear dish of a surface that can broadly be defined by ruled surface technique but in reality has an almost infinite definition that has had some computers I've used to actually model it truly stumped, especially when you do the following: intersect it with a second, obliquely-placed hyperbolic paraboloid-surfaced skewed cuboid. Fireworks! Lovely smooth moire-curves... It's the very essence of simplicity and complexity sharing the one space. Metaphorically, this is a treasure zone. Formally, I think it's beautiful and mathematically, I find it all highly intriguing. It's both circle and square, in a manner of speaking, so via that connection there are all sorts of architectural partis one can take a developmental route from.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/130/4000 ... b36e_o.jpg
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070223 tower jpeg.jpg
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Postby Guest » Fri Feb 23, 2007 11:32 pm

Cool!
Details of the sketch are visible not brightly.
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Postby solidred » Mon Feb 26, 2007 4:37 am

Yeah, I still haven't mastered the eps export function from AutoCAD yet.

The thing is still to be scaled down a bit and the models missing one part and due to have that ring thing at the top removed... lots of basic work yet to be done, I say in attaching a hopefully clearer image...
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Postby solidred » Mon Feb 26, 2007 4:39 am

I'll also get around to uploading some stuff on a primary school I'm also doing in the 'commodity and craft' thread since its issues are on that topic... :roll: so many design limitations, unlike this thing, which is my antidote. Still the challenges are fun of a different kind.
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