Organic Architecture

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Postby SDR » Mon Dec 17, 2007 6:39 pm

Cool ! And inevitable, one would hope, in this last and greatest of humankind's centuries. . .?

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Why does architecture need to be pure?

Postby usarender » Mon Dec 17, 2007 7:29 pm

Yes, this is most likely the last and greatest of humankind's centuries indeed.

And carrying this over to architecture is most likely inevitable as well.

Now, here is a good one -->>

Why does architecture need to be pure?

It is interesting that most academics and architects believe that architecture should remain pure. e.g, being true to the form in which the materials want to take, having the purest form.
But why is this necessary? Can architecture be explored as an art such as in cinematic/literary realm. to explore a theme of parody, experience, drama, even horror or comedy, playfulness. Will straying into the realms of exploration considered Un-Architectural?


Perhaps another carry over of modernism...


Towards a new architecture

Review
'The only piece of architectural writing that will be classed among the essential literature of the 20th century.' Reyner Banham --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description
In 'Vers une Architecture', published in 1923, Le Corbusier equates the pure forms of the machine with the pure forms of the Parthenon to illustrate his view of architecture as a question of mass rather than facades, and that machines are highly architectural. First published in English in 1927, it is the most influential architectural manifesto of modern times. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


If this book has received such a positive review by Reyner Banham, then it must surely be good....
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New Responsive Kinectic Architecture

Postby usarender » Sat Jan 05, 2008 7:19 pm

http://www.arch.columbia.edu/gsap/59970 ... sework.php

(The full link address above is valid, system is not recognizing, in tracing blue colors as the improper link)


Responsive Kinectic Architecture


Check out the link above, to see what some architectural schools have in the make in terms of organic architecture, environmentally responsive architecture -->> The New Kinectic Architecture, sensitive to technology and intent on integrating the new possibilities of computer technology with environmentally responsive buildings, by the use of technology to allow the buildings to deform and respond, rather then statically sit on the property withing a greener environment -->>

In the past fifteen years, some of the most vibrant experiments in architecture have used computer technologies to: (1) develop new types of geometries, with curves, facets, and non-standard shapes, and (2) fabricate architectural elements directly from digital .les without working drawings. Some of these digital processes are now completely integrated into practice while others are still being developed and redefined. Building on these investigations, a new type of post-digital experimentation has called into question the “muteness and inertness” of traditional materials. Recently, some architects have been using new technologies to explore and realize radically different kinds of spaces that respond to their environment in real time: responsive kinetic architecture.

Though the genre is too young to have a standard vocabulary, we define responsive kinetic architecture as an assembly with three components:

(1) Input—sensing environmental stimuli
(2) Processing—interpreting input data
(3) Output—correspondingly changing spatial configuration in real time

An example of this kind of assembly is a transparent building skin that detects carbon dioxide and opens and closes “gills” to control air quality in a room. Accelerated by developments in material science and manufacturing processes (including polymer technology, thin .lm deposition techniques, and nanotechnology), more and more fields have become aware of the possibilities of realizing interactive and moving systems. While biotechnology firms have used the technology to develop artificial muscles, architects Mark Goulthorpe and Kas Oosterhuis have created a morphing wall (Aegis Hypo-Surface, 2003) and a bending tower (MUSCLE Tower II, 2004). At this moment, responsive kinetic architecture is a fresh and promising .eld for hands-on laboratory research and for integration into built projects.
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Postby P.C. » Sat Jan 05, 2008 7:56 pm

Neat copy and paste -- do you have any genuine thought of your own ?

Mister lick up to the boss.
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Postby P.C. » Sat Jan 05, 2008 7:59 pm

usarender ;

"Looking at it, I have a feeling they copied one of my designs."

Oh you say so -- please show it to us.
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Postby usarender » Sat Jan 05, 2008 8:12 pm

On these guys go with their harassment. They seem to never learn.

Rather then do something constructive with their time, and contribute to these forums, and post relevant content to benefit all, they continue with their harassment and abusive behavior.

Those who are truly wise and participate in these forums will not tolerate this type of harassment and virtual abuse these people are committing in their wild attempts to slander other forum members.

Now the PC Parrot into action.

For those who wish to know, the truth about this PC, his system, his personality, and what he has done, please visit this topic -->>

The truth about 3DH and PC

(Just click on the link above to open a new window with the DC topic).
Last edited by usarender on Mon Jan 14, 2008 8:40 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby P.C. » Sun Jan 06, 2008 8:32 am

On the contrary -- I just asked you to show us all the design you talk about , how can that be an offense , isn't this what it said un the previous mail ;

"usarender ;

"Looking at it, I have a feeling they copied one of my designs."

Oh you say so -- please show it to us."

Then how can usarender see that as an offense ?
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Postby usarender » Sun Jan 06, 2008 2:16 pm

I tried to attache ONE of my designs which has been copied. This one I did in 1985 while studying architecture. But the system is not allowing the upload of any image, saying the limit of 2 MB has been reached. So I cannot post any samples of my design which have been copied by others.
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The True Organic Architecture

Postby usarender » Thu Jan 17, 2008 6:16 pm

It's high time we seek for a new organic design, a new language of organic architecture that will allow us to incorporate a deep concern with nature and human needs.

This means designing in a sense of a global community, and not soley as individual designers concerned with our own pocket, needs and project requirements. This means we must think of the planet as a whole, and design with it's needs in mind. Thus, we incorporate the latest in green technology not solely for our project needs, but for the global community needs and for the planet as a whole.

In organic design, we combine our business fundamentals of what makes good sense, with on site needs of the environment, user needs and the greater global community needs, in terms of social responsibility.

Developments can no longer feed on greed or the desire for profit and at the same time ignoring the community, ignoring the infra-structure, ignoring the greater needs of those who are impacted by such mega developments based on greed. Such speculative development is predatory and seeks not for the betterment of mankind, but solely for the betterment of the venture capitalists who fund such devastating projects, that completely drain all city resources in water, electricity and flood the roads and streets with an increasing number of vehicles, in a complete lack of concern for the environmental impact they are creating. Such projects occur frequently in third world and in developing countries, where the lack of community involvement, corruption and economic interests seem to rule at times. But we live in a changing world, and ever more even such countries are beginning to respond, to avoid their own destruction. It is high time we as designers do everything possible to avoid such predatory speculative development and inform our clients and community of the greater need to work as a global community, seeking for the betterment of this planet. This is the true organic architecture, one that is concerned with planet earth.
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Postby usarender » Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:47 pm

And Dubai certainly is a good sample of some late organic architecture being applied on a large scale --->>

What Makes Dubai's Architectural Market so Hot?

The Silver Screen of Architecture

THE NEW SILVER SCREEN OF ARCHITECTURE - Main Link

(To view the forum postings, just click on the blue letters above).
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