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Message - Re: re:especially to the rog the dodge!!!

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Posted by  Jim on August 05, 2003 at 11:51:28:

In Reply to:  re:especially to the rog the dodge!!! posted by the confused one on August 02, 2003 at 10:28:35:

Allow me to posit that the most 'sensuous' type of architecture is the theatre, (the indoor theatre), which was created to appeal to an audience rather than merely house one as earlier auditoria did. Regular buildings have always had to contain people and their activities more or less adequately, but there was no impetus to ATTRACT them beyond the signage and show windows that a commercial building might have. There are MANY books on theatre architecture (see: www.Amazon.com and search with the term "THEATRE ARCHITECTURE") that have noted this trend and necessity for theatres, probably the best of which is the 1973 British book "Theatres: An Architectural and Cultural History" by Simon Tidworth, available on inter-library loan. The culmination of sensuousness in theatres was the advent of the Movie Palace mostly in the USA in the 1920s which resulted in thousands of theatres in a wide variety of "sensuous" themes of styling and decor, sometimes wildly eclectic, some of which still exist. They were deliberately meant to dazzle the patron with a sensuouos atmosphere somewhat different from that previously seen in the Opera Houses there, and of course the Paris Opera is one of the most sensuous places in the world. To learn more of how the Movie Palace reached such an acme, see the book: "The Best Remaining Seats: The Story of the Golden Age of the Movie Palace" (1961 and later editions) by the late Ben M. Hall. One might also go to the site: www.HistoricTheatres.org where there are some photos as well as a "Bookstore" which will lead you to much more information. Just as an example, in the American city of Rockford, Ill. there is the CORONADO THEATRE which combines French Rococco, Japanese, and Art Noveau in a Spanish courtyard under a stars-and-clouds 'sky'. It sounds bizzare, but it is wonderfully imaginative and sensuous and it works! It has recently been restored and regular tours are given. See more about it at: www.coronadotheatre.com

It could also be said that such structures as Palaces and Night Clubs or similar eating places were 'sensuous' and often had places of entertainment as well. There are many books on both of those building types. As the world's morality has decayed ever more, one might think of the advent of "Gentlemens' Clubs" which feature the gyrations of naked women as "sensuous" in another sense, but whether these and other buildings such as those in Las Vegas which display the nearly-naked female form, are to be considered a 'sensuous' building type, one must judge for himself.

Does "sensuous" extend to the novelty outdoor structures such as giant ice cream cones, giant fishes, and other such giant outdoor images made into buildings to advertise their purpose? If so, there are books on these structures as well.

I hope that I have not stolen some of Rog's thunder, but possibly he will agree with me in what I have said.

 
 
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